Current Projects

AMPitup: Adolescent Movement Program

The Institute for Health Research, The University of Notre Dame Australia
Dr Fleur McIntyre, Dr Paola Chivers, Professor Beth Hands, Dr Adam Wigley

The Adolescent Movement Program has been running since 2010 as part of a longitudinal research program investigating the impact of movement difficulties on a range of physical, social and emotional health outcomes. The primary focus of the AMPitup program is to determine how best to develop physical fitness and movement skills in adolescents with movement difficulties through exercising in a supportive, fun and non-competitive setting. A long term aim of the program is to develop the skill and confidence in the participants to participate as adults in community-based exercise settings.

AMPitup researchers and trainers have recently been recognised in the media for the contribution they have made in improving the lives of participants. Read more here ABC Media Story

AMPitup: Bone Density Measures in adolescents with DCD

The Institute for Health Research, The University of Notre Dame Australia & Princess Margaret Hospital Perth.

Professor Beth Hands, Dr Fleur McIntyre, Dr Paola Chivers, Dr Aris Siafarikas, Dr Sophia Nimphius.

This component of the AMPitup program is reporting bone density measures in Adolescents with DCD, evaluating the effect of a 13 week exercise intervention program on bone density measures and then tracking participants longitudinally.

Animal Fun

Curtin University
Emeritus Prof Jan Piek; Sue McLaren.

Animal Fun is an inclusive, universal program developed to improve physical activity participation and promote both fine and gross motor skills as well as social development in young children aged 4-6 years. The program involves the imitation of movements of animals and is administered by pre-school/kindergarten teachers following comprehensive training. The associated research investigates whether the intervention program improves children’s motor ability and social development.

The relationship between motor coordination and mental health in young adults.

Curtin University, The University of Notre Dame Australia, The University of Western Australia

Emeritus Prof Jan Piek, Dr Daniela Rigoli, Prof Beth Hands, Dr Fleur McIntryre, Assistant Prof Melissa Licari.

A growing body of evidence supports the relationship between motor coordination and mental health outcomes in children and adolescents. However, research examining whether these relationships persist or change into early adulthood is currently unclear. This current study aims to examine the relationship between motor coordination, physical activity, and mental health outcomes (e.g., depression, anxiety and social support) in young adults.

Student Research Projects

Jess Reynolds - PhD Student
The University of Western Australia

Project Title:

Imitation and Motor Imagery in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: Investigation of Mirror Neuron Functioning.

Vincent Mancini - PhD Student
Curtin University

Project Title:

Motor coordination and internalizing problems: Investigating the Elaborated Environmental Stress Hypothesis.

Amanda Timler - PhD Student
The University of Notre Dame Australia

Project Title:

Who.i.am study: Identity formation and motor competence among adolescents.